Amoretti Classic Cocktail #19: Bishop Cocktail

If you’ve been following our Classic Cocktail series over the last few weeks, we hope you’ve been able to put some old drink recipes to good use. We’ve covered classics like the Sidecar, Mojito, and Deauville. Today, we want to focus on a drink recipe that’s a little bit different – the Bishop Cocktail.

The Bishop Cocktail can be made in many variations. Some treat it like a well drink with a “shot” of wine, while others approach it as a sangria. We’re fond of the classic drink recipe, which first appeared many years ago in The Old Waldorf-Astoria Bar Book.

The Bishop Drink Recipe


  • Ingredients:
  • Directions:
  • Add all ingredients to a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake and strain into a chilled red wine glass.

    Organic Blue Agave Nectar

    This rum drink recipe is almost like an Old Fashioned without the bitters. It has a dark spirit, fruit flavor, and a little simple syrup (in this case our organic agave nectar). Add a few dashes of bitters, and you’ll have a totally different drink recipe with little effort in modification!

    What Is Organic Agave Nectar?

    The nectar we use in this product comes from the blue agave plant. Blue agave has been used for thousands of years to sweeten food and beverages. It’s actually sweeter than traditional sugar, but much healthier for you, which is why we like to substitute it in place of “simple syrups” in most drink recipes.

    To learn more about this organic agave nectar, check out this blog post from December that answers six of the most commonly asked questions about blue agave. In the meantime, we hope you enjoy the Bishop as much as we have this winter. It also makes for a tasty hot beverage. Simply boil some water and turn it into a hot toddy.

    If you decide to make your own variation of this classic, we’d love to hear about it! Share your version of this drink recipe with us and other Amoretti fans at the official Amoretti Facebook page. We look forward to seeing what you come up with!

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