Like to Make Gourmet Espresso Drinks? Know Your Espresso History (pt 1/2)

Espresso was developed in order to reduce the amount of time allowed for factory workers’ coffee break

Espresso was developed in order to reduce the amount of time allowed for factory workers’ coffee break

Our team at Amoretti is constantly learning. Whether we’re developing our knowledge about the very basic, most raw natural ingredients or whether we’re trying to perfect a new beverage syrup or martini mix through “field tests,” one thing’s for sure: we’re always taking in new information!

This week, we’ve been doing a little research on espresso: its origins, caffeine content, and development over the last 100+ years. We thought we’d share a little bit about this wonderful nectar of the gods (which turns out to be a nectar of the Industrial Revolution, by the way) with Amoretti Blog readers…

A fantastic way to get that great coffee taste without paying your local coffee shop your life savings to get that delicious java boost!

A fantastic way to get that great coffee taste without paying your local coffee shop your life savings to get that delicious java boost!

A Brief History of Espresso

Let’s start things off by addressing the origins of this beverage. As it turns out, espresso isn’t some primordial creation bestowed on mankind. On the contrary, it was developed by a man named Luigi Bezzera, an engineer from Milan, in order to reduce the amount of time allowed for factory workers’ coffee break. Factory owners had become discontent with the long breaks which slowed production and sucked away from efficiency.

The new pressurized device nipped this problem in the bud and quickly spread outside of the factories into restaurants and cafes throughout Italy. This device, now recognized as an “espresso machine” was patented in 1901, making it 112 years old.

It wasn’t until the 1940s, however, that the espresso machine became primarily piston-based, which eliminated the burnt taste that espresso suffered from during its first 40 years. The popular machine that made espresso mainstream was the 1947 Gaggia Crème Caffe machine. The thicker consistency now associated with high-quality espresso also came about during this time. Slowly, espresso machines expanded beyond ritzy coffee parlors and into the consumer’s home.

Of course, espresso didn’t really become popular in the United States until a certain large green-and-loosely-nautically-themed café from Seattle, Washington began popping up on busy street corners all around America. The rest, as they say, is history.

Looking for More Espresso Facts?

Check back tomorrow for more facts about this delicious beverage. If you like to make gourmet espresso drinks, then you’ll enjoy our facts about caffeine content, perfect shot pull-times, and more! In the meantime, pick up a bottle of Amoretti Premium Espresso Coffee Syrup to add that great espresso taste to baked goods, cocktails, and more. It’s one of our most unique beverage syrups yet!

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