As one of the most commonly used materials for coffee mugs, porcelain is ubiquitous for a reason.

As one of the most commonly used materials for coffee mugs, porcelain is ubiquitous for a reason.

Every wine aficionado knows that you can’t serve a full-bodied Pinot Noir in a champagne flute. Nor would it make sense to serve a cabernet in a small glass made for a young and bright red wine.

Nutmeg Syrup

A touch of our Amoretti Premium Nutmeg Syrup can bring out flavors in the chai you might not have noticed before.

Wine isn’t the only beverage that has a very specific set of rules governing its enjoyment. Craft beer lovers know that the only way to drink a wheat beer is in a traditional Bavarian Weizen Glass (the tall, thin glass shows off the weizenbier’s color while preserving the foamy head). Similarly, a German Stange glass is hands down the best way to drink a Lambic and other delicate beers noted for their botanicals.

So what about coffee? Does vessel shape and material affect the nuances and tastes of coffee in a similar way? We’ve done a little experimentation with different types of containers. Here’s what we found:

  • Porcelain: It’s hard to go wrong with porcelain. As one of the most commonly used materials for coffee mugs, porcelain is ubiquitous for a reason. It imparts no noticeable taste to the coffee – which is exactly what you want when you’re enjoying a fine cup of roast. Note that there are different glazes on porcelain mugs; some are glossy while others have a matte finish. Again, we haven’t noticed any difference in taste between these finishes.
  • Plastic/Paper/Styrofoam: We’re lumping all three of these detestable materials into one category because they’re coffee-destroyers. Avoid at all costs.
  • Glass: Many people swear by their glass coffee mugs. While porcelain is our go-to, glass is our runner up for drinking coffee. Glass imparts no taste whatsoever. Plus, it lends itself well to a visually striking effect!
  • Stainless Steel: Cheap stainless steel travel mugs can leach metals into your coffee, which is bad for your taste buds and bad for you. While high quality ones are supposed to be “leach-proof,” we still try to avoid stainless steel when possible. Our recommendation for travel mugs? Opt for a stainless steel one with a glass or ceramic lining on the inside. It’s worth it!

Of course, the mug only affects the taste of your coffee in the smallest way when compared to the changes that a great coffee syrup can allow! Looking to really change up how your morning cup of Joe tastes? Then pick up a bottle of Amoretti Premium Nutmeg Syrup to see just how different coffee can be!

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